GQ And Kap: A Minstrel Show.

So, GQ magazine has decided to name Collin Kaepernick their Citizen of The Year. I can understand why they would want to do that. Their sales figures are in the crapper compared to what they should be and what they have been in the past. They have no cultural relevance anymore. Grabbing a bit of controversy will get them some much-needed attention, and sell a few million issues. That being said, is it really GQ magazine’s place to be doing something like this? This is a deeply disingenuous action on their part.

It Gets The People Going

Colin Kaepernick has been a source of controversy since he began taking a knee during the national anthem at the beginning of each NFL football game. His reason for doing it was to protest the high number of black people being shot by cops. Years of FBI statistics and data will show that there is not a high number of black people being shot by cops, and in fact it is more likely that a white person will be shot by a cop then a black person. Statistically speaking, of course. That being said, Colin’s next move, after not being rehired in the NFL, was to attempt to sue his way into a job. That has, as yet, proved fruitless. And rightly so. His penchant for creating controversy, however, has not appeared to die down. From his racist girlfriend’s tweets to his friendship with the venomous Linda Sarsour, to advocating for the regime in Cuba, to applauding Marxist thug Che Guevara, to declaring American police officers are “pigs”, to supporting convicted terrorist Assata Shakur, to going 1-10 as a starter in 2016, and going 2-6 as a starter in 2015, he shows his proclivity towards being both controversial and relatively useless.

It seems an odd choice then, with so many better people on this planet such as Tom Hanks or Gary Sinise, or Larry Elder or a plethora of other more qualified individuals, that they would pick Colin Kaepernick as their Citizen of The Year.

The Minstrel Show

That is, until you realize, that while simply not liking Colin Kaepernick is, these days, considered an act of racism, parading him around as an Al Jolson-esque minstrel to get attention is not. The only reason GQ magazine or any other publication would want to put Colin Kaepernick in their front line would be simply for attention, which GQ desperately needs.

To further this, I’d like to do a little experiment. Let’s go ahead and Google GQ magazine’s key board members, and then go to images.

Interesting.

Even in group photos, where people are milling about in the background, not a single black person can be seen. It’s an interesting contrast to the virtue signaling that they are doing with their Citizen of The Year issue.

The Closer

I’m going to close this article abruptly, saying this: pay attention to what people are doing, not what they are saying. It has been my experience in the past few years to see and make a note of the fact that when people are virtue signaling, it is by and large and immediate sign that they are guilty of what they are talking about. It’s like the girlfriend who constantly accuses you of cheating, because she herself is cheating.

Don’t believe the hype.

I’m not with Kap, Part 2: Leave Your Baggage at Home.

Colin Kaepernick is reportedly hiring a lawyer and turning toward litigation as a way to try to get his job back with the NFL. In other words, America is being forced to watch a rich spoiled brat grandstand about and force a company to act against its own best interest.

I’m going to tell you a story. When I was a little bit younger and a lot more foolish, I was at work one night, and I and my colleagues were bored. We started trading jokes back-and-forth as any group of people with any amount of sense does. It all went downhill, however, when I decided to up the ante. I proceeded to jump up onto the desk of the officer in charge. Now, I didn’t hear anything about it after that, except that it was an occasionally funny anecdote shared between other officers.

One day, after saving up a lot of money, and having already enrolled in college, I decided to put in my two weeks. That was all well and good, and I thought that I was leaving on good terms. A few mishaps later, I found myself looking for a job again. Well, where did I have a good reputation? Where did I have a captain who would take me back in a heartbeat? So, I applied. Turns out that my little incident came back to haunt me.

Even though it had been years, my name was on a list of people that were not eligible for rehire. I have since matured quite a bit, thanks in part to that cold whiff of reality. The thing is, I don’t blame them. I had, unintentionally, made myself a liability. Someone who might make the company look bad in the future. I excepted this, like a rational adult, and moved on.

Colin Kaepernick’s recent bout of tantrums only goes to show how poor of an employee he truly was. The NFL isn’t ignoring him due to racism. They are not ignoring him due to any desire they have to see black people shot on the streets by cops. I would be willing to go out on a limb and even say that they are not ignoring him because he protested.

I will absolutely say that he is not rehireable due to the fact that he chose to act on his own agenda while on the clock at work. I say that because that’s what happens to any person who has a job with any company. If you work at Walmart as a cashier and choose to take a knee instead of helping a customer, you’re probably not going to get rehired.

But that’s normal folk, right?

Colin, being the rich spoiled brat that he is, gets to flout the rules, and be his own boss.

And, this is the crux of the problem, isn’t it? The rich have gotten away with so much for so long, that the millennial generation, having watched this for decades, now feels that they are equally as entitled.

Whether it be pulling your parents in for job interviews, or simply hiring a lawyer to try and sue your self back to work, it all comes down to spoiled brats feeling entitled and not willing to suffer the consequences of their own foolish actions.

Apparently, responsibility is a thing of the past.
Companion video here.

I’m Not With Kap.

In this post, I make the assumption that you already know what’s going on with Colin Kaepernick.

In recent news, there’s been a bit of drama unfolding over the state of Colin Kaepernick’s unemployment. Apparently, no teams will take him. Word is that coaches fear that he will continue to bring his brand of protesting to their field, and possibly break up their locker room chemistry with his opinions.

They fear that they have a lot to lose by hiring him, while not gaining a very valuable player. He’s kind of a hybrid quarterback, rather than an offensive pocket passer. Imagine that. Offensive off the field instead of on it.

Besides that, no one hears him talk about wanting to work. It is instead other people who want him to work. They want someone famous and black(ish) to kneel during the anthem, and get paid to disrespect this country. They want a figurehead to point to when no one will listen.

This one man circus act is indicative of a larger problem with today’s youth, particularly the college age peopleĀ I’m seeing these days who are unemployed, or not employable. These people are young, but think that they know everything. They are entitled, while they have contributed little.

It is, at its core, a personal issue. These people feel that they can bring their opinions and their drama and their politics to their place of work, and feel that it should be okay to telegraph their issues to everyone they encounter. Moreover, many of them, never having been properly scolded while growing up, now feel that it is an injustice when they are stymied or stifled. Walk into a Whole Foods wearing a Trump hat, and wait for the employee that feels he can lecture you on politics instead of doing his job. These are the same people that would call it a micro aggression when I said ‘his job’.

I hate to be a bearer of ill will, but I hope that Colin Kaepernick does not find a place within an NFL team. I hope he serves as an example to those who feel that they can use their job as a platform for their various idiosyncrasies. It’s time for professionalism to come back.